Nathan Adrian

Who will find glory on Day 5?

A very quick rundown of tonight’s medal predictions…

MEN’S 200 BREASTSTROKE

This is the tightest and arguably strongest field of any of the Olympic finals this week. Seven men separated by half a second, with the slowest man in the final posting 2.08.20 in 8th. This is only 1.19 seconds away from the World Record. Try and find another final this week where the swimmer standing behind Lane 8 is as close to the WR! In the Men’s 200 freestyle it was 4.23 seconds and in the Men’s 200 butterfly the gap was 4.52 seconds. In the Women’s 200IM it was a range of 4.75 seconds going into the final. The closest was the Women’s 200 freestyle, which was set at 3.65 secs.

This only means it will be an incredibly close field and anyone can win it. Prenot has the fastest lifetime best. Watanabe broke the Olympic record in the semi-finals and Willis is the most experienced of all. The World Champion from 2015, Marco Koch, has a lane too but with reports of a shoulder injury he may not be as dangerous as previously thought. The German did however ask his Government for £1m Euro bonus if he wins gold, to replicate other sports with larger financial rewards. So don’t count him out just yet!

SwimWords podium prediction:

  GOLD SILVER BRONZE
Men’s 200 Breaststroke Prenot Watanabe Willis

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Where were you?

Where were you?

Where were you when Beamon jumped 8.90m? When Jonathan Edwards jumped 18.29m? When Bolt went 9.58 in Berlin, when Michael Johnson ran 43.18 for one lap of the track, or when Radcliffe never faded to 2:15.25 in 2003?

Where were you when Adam Peaty swam 57.13 for 100m Breaststroke?

Unfortunately, for the majority of the British public, they were in bed asleep. Those who weren’t were curled up on the sofa counting down the minutes of sleep they were losing before they had to be up for work. Some though were very fortunate to be in the 15,000 capacity crowd in the Rio De Janeiro Olympic pool. What they witnessed was simply stunning. (more…)

How do the men shape up for the relays in Rio?

As promised here comes the second installment of relay predictions and analysis from #SwimWords but this time we evaluate the Men’s team standings….

Whereas the women will be likely knocking on the door of World Records in at least two out of three relays, the men have not been able to replicate the speed they found in the team events of 2008 and 2009. This, quite understandably, is a reflection on the change in swimsuit regulations; where men were able to wear suits that covered their full body. The change in rules, only allowing men to wear jammers (waist to knee), was a larger jump in material reduction than the women experienced (shoulder to knee) and therefore might correlate in the fact the women are closer (if not now faster) than the times recorded in that ‘super-suit’ era. The ‘super-suit’ providing increased compression and buoyancy aiding the performance of swimmers and resulting in faster racing.

Nevertheless there will be some very exciting battles between the men’s teams in Brazil. Some of the ‘big hitter’ nations, who were alarming disappointing last year (Australia and USA), will look to reassert their dominance in these relay events. (more…)

U.S. Olympic Team Trials & Tribulations

The dust has settled on the US Olympic Swimming Trials, with 45 athletes named on the team. USA Swimming continue to be the benchmark for empowering their athletes and giving them a platform to perform on the big stage. There is nothing more exhilarating than competing in front of a large crowd, in a world class field of athletes. The adrenaline courses through your veins in that environment and drives you to better performances; exactly the atmosphere you want to create for your athletes.

The newly crowned American Olympic Team are now likely to be straight back to the pool for a short 2-3 week high intensity training cycle depending on their selected events, before commencing another taper period in advance of the Games. The US team are used to this ‘double-taper’ strategy. It has been the method of choice in recent years for USA Swimming and is often required throughout the collegiate swim season. Athletes are nominated to represent their respective college and university teams in conference and NCAA competitions just a few short weeks apart and, by in large, must peak for these before going onto to compete for selection to the major Championships at the US Nationals. (more…)